1. Parenting
Send to a Friend via Email

Readers Respond: How Do You Feel About Dave Pelzer's Life Story?

Responses: 64

By

Dave Pelzer entered the foster care system at age 12. He endured 5 different foster homes before aging out of the system at age 18. He went on to become an accomplished author, with his first book, A Child Called 'It', which details the story of the horrible abuse and neglect he suffered at the hand of his mother. But despite his world renowned books, speaking engagements, and documentation from teachers and social workers who worked with him as a youth, there are some who question the validity of his story.

What is your reaction to Dave Pelzer's life story?

Share Your Reaction

the same

everyone goes thought things some different than others.. i myself have been through the same as many of you, and with that i'm glad to know others out there are trying to stop thins and make a difference...
—Guest kay

Amazing book

My friend stephany and I have both read the book and it's amazing!! Stephany has read it 5 times and cries every time. I've only read it once and I can see that your mom is a heartless souless evil little demon from hell. The people who get abused are the ones who deserve it the least.
—Guest Sophia

How I Feel

I think that little boy should have never endured that kind of abuse! Thank God that today he has a better life! Prayers go out to you.
—Guest Shania

sad story

i am so sorry to hear that your mom did that to you i read your book and i cryed i cant believe that you stayed strong threw that hole thing i would of told someone ur a strong man and never let anyone ever put you down again dave ur a wonderful author
—Guest gabby baker

Thank you!

Thank you Dave for having the courage to write what you endured. I am so sorry you did not receive help sooner. You are an inspiration, breaking the cycle. God and I are impressed by your perseverance. I am going to do my best to find out if anybody in my life is abused, and how I can help! Thank you!
—Guest Nicole

To Grace

It is amazing that such a young boy was able to look inside himself and keep himself alive through the years of torture and neglect that he endured at the hands of the very people who were there to love and protect him. I would remind commented "Grace" that child abuse laws have changed exponentially in the past 3 decades and yet we still are hearing about horrific abuse and child murder at the hands of parents. Why would anyone with a smidgeon of common sense not believe the story of this remarkable man. As to Grace's thoughts on the writing style, did she not read at the beginning of the book where it is written through the eyes and in the language of a young boy? It's people like Grace that allow the perpetuation of child abuse by closing eyes and minds to a problem and condemning the victims for being "untruthfully". Do we wonder why victims are afraid to speak out and abusers gain power? Grace you personify the question: "ever notice how common sense isn't so common anymore?".
—Guest Dani

Unbelievable So Sad

I was abused as a child for years by my step father the devil and two uncles. Finally, at the age of 40 I confronted them and finally told my daddy. It was the beginning of my healing. My mother did nothing to help me while it happened. My life was a mess for years and years until I faced it head on. Your book was horribly heartbreaking and makes me cry to hear the torture you endured and to think you had no one to help you. The monsters don't care that they are scaring us for years and years to come. You are an amazing, very strong person that will be an inspiration to so many of us that suffered abuse for years at the hands of people that should have loved us and not beat and molested us. Thank you for sharing your story and I cant wait to read "The Lost Boy."
—Guest Brenda Kritsonis

Unbelievable

I cried when I read, "A Child Called 'It'" and "The Lost Boy". I just can't believe that people can be so harsh to their children I'm a mother of 3 and my sons handicapped. I could never imagine doing any thing to any of them. My daughters both had your books in school for reading reports. You are an awesome writer keep the books coming love your books. Thank You Marie Ebert..
—Guest Marie

Maybe

maybe when a teacher looks at a child that seems lost maybe they are, and sometimes a kind word can go far to a child who is being abused. I realize to some people that is not much, but to others it can be the world. When I was younger I had a friend who told me their family had no washer and she was scared everyone would know and tease her, well she was my best friend so I was 12 and her 12. I told her to pack her bag with her and her brothers clothes and come to our place for the weekend well she did and we did her clothes her and I. I told my parents for school that I would pack my own lunch as everyone else did, so they agreed and I took twice the food and shared with her and her brother. And this went on for years then when I was 25 my nana told me I was a very caring person i said how she said I saw you doing other clothes that were not yours. My point is you see someone hungry share. what is a sandwich or a kind word to you nothing to someone else it could be everything.
—Guest what

I Own All Dave's Books and Richard's

And am appalled that he was not taken out of the house way before he was. He was eating food from garbage can, and hiding in the basement. How the School did not pinpoint the abuse and the severity of it sooner I will never be able to understand. As a former teacher I just know that the Schools could be doing much more now and in the past. I am a survivor of rape, incest and people do not believe my story as I relate it. When one allows themselves to go back and remember, it is so very painful. Dave must be commended in the field of social work and education more and more and I believe his story can help save the lives of many children and also adults who underwent these type situations. Dave is so very courageous and well, his perseverance is a hallmark for all of us.
—dmcardinals4

I Went Thru Something Similar

I read Dave's story while in Grad school at the University of Southern Indiana and was gripped by the story, not being able to put any of his books down. I am thinking of writing my own incest, abuse story but still can't decide when to write, who to include in it. I was called an imp by my Aunt, after my brother committed incest. It's still so upsetting at the age of 56 that my sexual responses are not as they should be. I think this story of Dave, his mother and little brother in particular is so important for educational programs in High School and University levels that it should be a required reading for any class a professor can incorporate it into. Dave is a true beacon for all abused men, women and children in America.
—Guest Diane Minton

a sad story for a child

It is a really sad story to hear from a child that has to pass through something not one child should pass through. I hope to some of us this story can be a help to give an example of how to be loving parents and not hate what the father GOD has given us.
—Guest sandy morato

How I feel?

I feel that Dave did something that any child of dreaming of to get out of a child abuse mother of his and i feel that dave in his books felt alive and very outstanding to all of his readers.
—Guest samantha phelan

How I Feel

I am only half way into the first book but I feel very horrified that any mother would do that to their child...I find that very mean and the person doing it should be in jail forever.
—Guest haylee johnson

No Way

I'm sorry about your past. I can honestly say that I know what you went through. At the age of 10 for me, my mom was doing drugs and etc. Still to this day i am the age 15 and still in foster care. I don't know how you do it.
—Guest Hannah Meeks

Share Your Reaction

How Do You Feel About Dave Pelzer's Life Story?

Receive a one-time notification when your response is published.

©2014 About.com. All rights reserved.